Andrea Young Awarded the 2016 Packard Fellowship

In two dimensions, where states of matter are possible that cannot otherwise be realized, the laws of physics are different.

This is the scientific playground of UC Santa Barbara experimental condensed matter physicist Andrea Young. His group focuses on creating electronic devices where such states are realized, and develops measurement techniques to probe their macroscopic quantum mechanical properties.

In recognition of his accomplishments and to allow him to continue his work in this area, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation has awarded Young a 2016 Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering. As one of this year’s 18 innovative early-career recipients, Young will receive a grant of $875,000 over five years to pursue his research.

“We are thrilled that Professor Young’s great promise and exciting research have proudly been rewarded with this prestigious and competitive fellowship,” said UCSB Chancellor Henry T. Yang. “The Packard Foundation has recognized Andrea’s passionate, creative and innovative work and his incredible potential to make groundbreaking discoveries. We at UC Santa Barbara look forward to his many future contributions as he continues to explore the frontiers of electronic states in quantum materials.”

Young works with van der Waals heterostructures, which consist of layered stacks of two-dimensional materials, most notably graphene. This single-atom-thick material can be engineered to host a variety of exotic states — for example, topological insulators, where current can flow unimpeded on the sample boundary while the two-dimensional bulk remains electrically insulating.

Read the full article at the Current — "2-D Physics"

Andrea Young